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Retired butcher goes under the knife for life-changing shoulder surgery

A retired Nottinghamshire butcher is undergoing computer-navigated shoulder surgery at Nottingham University Hospitals Trust (NUH) to end his shoulder pain and improve his life.

William Goff, 72 years old from Warsop has been living with shoulder arthritis pain for the last 18 months. He said: “The pain has got progressively worse over the last year and my range of movement is restricted as the pain really does affect everything I do, from putting the handbrake on in the car or putting a jumper on over my head – these are near impossible tasks. This operation will be the best Christmas present and I am so looking forward to being able to enjoy my retirement properly, as my wife and I are very active in our local community particularly around this time of year.”

NUH is one of two NHS Trusts in the East Midlands who carry out this style of shoulder replacement surgery which includes inserting a wedge shape implant into the patient’s shoulder, guided by computer navigation technology. Mr Goff is one of only ten patients in Nottingham to have been treated using this technique since it was introduced in November last year.

Mr Malin Wijeratna, Orthopaedic Consultant, who performed the computer-navigated shoulder surgery on Mr Goff, said: “The technology used in computer-navigated shoulder surgery helps us to accurately plan precisely where the new implant should be inserted, as movement as little as 2mm can make all the difference to the patient’s range and wear over time. 

“The software is more accurate than the human eye and a CT scan for planning complex shoulder procedures. By sitting the implant in the perfect position, the new joint will work better and hopefully last longer for the patient, giving them relief from pain and allowing them to move more freely.”

Mr Goff who retired earlier this year after working for 55 years as a butcher, added: “What I am most looking forward to is not feeling this pain anymore, and that will be life changing. By June I hope to be back out in the caravan planning trips and being active as my wife and I are always busy doing something. As they say, no pain no gain and I am very much looking forward to taking it easy over the next few weeks after surgery and letting somebody else carve the Christmas turkey this year!"