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Volunteers profiles

Want to know what it's like to volunteer at NUH? Read the profiles below from current volunteers here at NUH.

Jean Robinson - Ward B26

                                  Jean Robinson image

We’re celebrating the dedicated volunteers who have reached long service milestones at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust this year by chatting to them about what it means to help out at our hospitals.

Meet Jean Robinson, who volunteers on Ward B26 at the Queen’s Medical Centre (QMC). Jean has been a friendly face on the maternity ward for ten years this year.  

Jean started off working at on at QMC as part of the domestic team, where she would often work on B26, before retiring in December 2008. By February 2009, she was back at the hospital volunteering.                                                                                 

Jean said: “I come in at eight in the morning and I’ll help out with anything the team want me to do. I do bed rounds and I help take ladies for a scan - I do a bit of everything. Every now and again I get to cuddle a baby too!”

“When I actually worked here, before I volunteered, there was a couple on the ward, and the man used to travel here straight from work and there never used to be any hot water. When he came in, I used to go and fill the hot water tape up so that he could have a hot drink after work. When his wife had the baby and they were going, they gave me a big bouquet of flowers!

“Everyone’s so nice and I feel part of the furniture. I’ve seen lots of staff come and go but I get on with all of everyone, and my fellow volunteers – even when I’ve been off sick I’ve had some of the of them phone me to see if I’m okay.”

When asked how long she will keep volunteering for, Jean said: “While I can keep doing it, I will. I’ve done it for so long now that I don’t want to give it up. I really enjoy volunteering – I try and go out every day but I look forward to Thursdays when I volunteer. It’s like a family here that I haven’t got at home – they look out for me during tough times and have even bought me flowers when I’ve been going through difficulties.

 

I’ve worked for the NHS for that long that I feel like I’m part of it and I don’t want to give it up. It keeps me going and I feel part of a team on B26.

 

Congratulations on your voluntary long service, Jean!

Martin Perry - City Outpatients Meet and Greet

                                     Martin Perry image

We’re celebrating the dedicated volunteers who have reached long service milestones at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust this year by talking to them about what it means to volunteer at our hospitals.

Martin Perry is one of our Meet and Greet volunteers based at City Hospital Outpatients. Martin has been volunteering at Nottingham’s hospitals since 2008.

Martin said: “I chose to volunteer having experienced the excellent work that the volunteers do whilst taking my father and mother for treatment at the City Hospital over a number of years.

“From the outset, the most enjoyable aspect of my job was meeting people and trying to help them. Highlighting a best experience is difficult because something really interesting happened nearly every week!”

Asked about his earliest experiences of volunteering, just over 10 years ago, Martin said: “My earliest memory of working at NUH was meeting my fellow volunteers Shirley and Richard and benefiting from their excellent stewardship. The importance of quality guidance at the start of a new job cannot be overstated.

My role is firstly to meet and greet patients, removing as much stress as possible for them, and direct them to the correct part of the hospital pleasantly and efficiently. Secondly, I like to be at the ‘beck and call’ of our nurses and admin staff.

Martin was also asked what it is that keeps him volunteering: “I keep volunteering because I feel part of a team and I think we fulfil a really important role in the hospital. I never begrudge a second I spend volunteering – I get up at 6:30am every Friday and look forward to my morning’s work.”

Congratulations on your long service, Martin!