If you need medical care or advice that is urgent but not an immediate, genuine emergency, please visit https://111.nhs.uk/ or call 111 first so that trained NHS 111 advisors can tell you the best place to be seen quickly.

Routine Antenatal Care (Before a baby is born)

Antenatal care refers to the care you receive in your pregnancy before your baby is born.

At your first appointment your midwife will recommend either midwife led or consultant/ obstetric (doctor) led antenatal care. This will depend on a variety of factors including your physical or mental health, family history, or events in a previous pregnancy.  If there are no identified risk factors then your antenatal care will be provided by the community midwifery team.

You will have a number of antenatal appointments during your pregnancy, and you will see a midwife or sometimes an obstetrician (doctor specialising in pregnancy).  They will check the health of you and your baby and give you useful information and answer any questions.

If this is your first baby, it is likely you will have more appointments than someone who has already had children.

First contact with a midwife or doctor

Please contact your GP or midwife as soon as possible after you find out you are pregnant so they can talk you through your options, give you health advice and book in your antenatal appointments.

Dating Scan

This is the ultrasound scan to estimate when you baby is due, check baby's physical development, and screen for any possible conditions, including Down's Syndrome.  It is usually around 10 to 14 weeks of pregnancy.

16 Weeks

Your midwife or doctor will give you information about the ultrasound scan you'll be offered at 18 to 20 weeks. They'll also help with any concerns or questions you have, and should: 

  • review, discuss and record the results of any screening tests
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein
  • consider an iron supplement if you're anaemic.

20 Week Scan

The 20 week can is usually carried out when you're between 18 and 21 weeks pregnant. Sometimes called the mid-pregnancy or anomaly scan, this will check your baby's development and will look for conditions such as cleft lip and open spina bifida. From 16 weeks, you will also be offered the whooping cough vaccine.

25 Weeks Pregnant

If this is your first baby, you should have an appointment at 25 weeks.  At this appointment, your midwife or doctor should: 

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.

 28 Weeks Pregnant

At this appointment, your midwife or doctor should: 

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein
  • offer more screening tests
  • offer your first anti-D treatment if you're rhesus negative
  • consider an iron supplement if you're anaemic

31 Weeks Pregnant

You'll have an appointment at 31 weeks if this is your first baby.  At this appointment, your midwife or doctor should:

  • review, discuss and record the results of any screening tests from the last appointment
  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein

34 Weeks Pregnant

At this appointment, your midwife or doctor should give you information about preparing for labour and birth, including how to recognise active labour, ways of coping with pain in labour, and your birth plan and information about caesarean section.  They should also: 

  • review, discuss and record the results of any screening tests from the last appointment
  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein
  • offer your second anti-D treatment if you're rhesus negative

36 Weeks Pregnant

At this apointment, your midwife or doctor should give you information about:

  • breastfeeding
  • caring for your newborn baby
  • vitamin K and screening tests for your newborn baby
  • your own health after your baby is born
  • the "baby blues" and postnatal depression

And will also:

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • check the position of your baby
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein
  • offer external cephalic version (ECV) if your baby is in the breech position

38 Weeks Pregnant

You should learn about the options and choices of what happens if your pregnancy lasts longer than 41 weeks.  Your midwife or doctor should: 

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein

40  Weeks Pregnant

You will have a 40 week appointment if this is your first baby.  Your midwife or doctor should:

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein

41 Weeks Pregnant

Your midwife or doctor should: 

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein
  • offer a membrane sweep
  • discuss the options and choices for induction of labour.

42 Weeks Pregnant

If you have not had your baby by 42 weeks and have chosen not to have an induction, you will be offered increased monitoring.  

 

Community Midwifery

You will have a named midwife who works within a team of 5-10 others. Our community midwifery teams run from several bases through Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire.

When you have confirmed that you are pregnant with a home test (usually around 6 weeks from the first day of your last period) please contact your local team to request a booking appointment.

You can do this by contacting your GP surgery, or phoning our community team directly at their relevant base (see further contact details).

You will receive a number of routine appointments with your community midwife during your pregnancy.

 

Your first appointment

Your midwife will go through your medical history including family history, previous pregnancies, your social circumstances, smoking and alcohol use. 

They may then refer you to Obstetric team, Antenatal care or one of our Specialist services. 

They will discuss your options for where you would like to give birth and preferences and will measure: your weight and height and calculate your BMI. They will ask for a urine sample, and offer a carbon monoxide (CO) check.

They will give you a hand held maternity booklet, which you should carry with you at all times during your pregnancy.

 

Community Midwives - Contact Us

COMMUNITY MIDWIVES TEAM BASES AND CONTACT DETAILS

For non-urgent queries.

Messages can be left for the teams. Response can be up to 48hrs so please contact Community Coordinator if urgent.

ARNOLD MIDWIVES

Byron Court, Brookfield Road, Arnold,

Nottingham

NG5 7ER

Tel: 0115 883 1862

BEESTON MIDWIVES

Beeston HC, Dovecote House,

38 Wollaton Road, Beeston,

Nottingham

NG9 2NR   

Tel: 0115 854 2264 

BESTWOOD AND SHERWOOD MIDWIVES

Southglade Access Centre,

Southglade Road,

Nottingham NG5 5GU

Tel: 0115 876 1891  

BULWELL MIDWIVES

Bulwell Riverside

Main Street, Bulwell, Nottingham

NG6 8QJ

Tel: 0115 883 3368 (contact via Strelley Team at Broxtowe CC)

CARLTON MIDWIVES

Park House Health & Social Care Centre, Burton Road, Carlton,

Nottingham NG4 3DQ    

Tel: 0115 955 5391

CLIFTON MIDWIVES          

Clifton Cornerstone, Southchurch Drive, 

Nottingham

NG11 8EW

Tel: 0115 878 6168

HUCKNALL AND EASTWOOD MIDWIVES

Hucknall HC, 54 Curtis Street, Hucknall, Nottingham

NG15 7JE  

Tel: 0115 883 2128

MARY POTTER  MIDWIVES

Mary Potter Centre, Gregory Boulevard, Hyson Green, Nottingham

NG7 5HY

Tel: 0115 883 8414

RADFORD MIDWIVES   

Radford HC, Ilkeston Road,

Nottingham

NG7 3GW

Tel: 0115 883 4000

RUSHCLIFFE MIDWIVES

Keyworth Primary Care Centre, Bunny Lane, Keyworth, Nottingham

NG12 5JU

Tel: 0115 844 0504

ST ANNS MIDWIVES

St Ann’s Valley Centre, 2 Livingston Road, St Ann’s, Nottingham

NG3 3GG

Tel: 0115 883 8755

STAPLEFORD MIDWIVES

Stapleford Care Centre, Church Street, Stapleford,

Nottingham

NG9 8DB

Tel: 0115 883 5078

STRELLEY MIDWIVES

Broxtowe Children’s Centre

The Cornerhouse, 18 Strelley Road, Nottingham

NG8 3AP

Tel: 0115 883 3368

WEST BRIDGFORD MIDWIVES (inc. Meadows)

West Bridgford Health Centre,

97 Musters Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham

NG2 7PX

Tel: 0115 952 9422

WOLLATON MIDWIVES

Wollaton HC, Wollaton Vale, Wollaton

Nottingham

NG8 2GR

Tel:  0115 883 3100

TEENAGE MIDWIVES

Old Basford HC, Bailey Street,

Nottingham

NG6 0HD

Tel: 0115 883 3215

SPECIALIST TEAMS (Alcohol / Drug Misuse, Mental Health, Homeless and Domestic Abuse)            

Byron Court, Brookfield Road, Arnold

NG5 7ER

Tel: 0115 883 1748

Obstetric Team Care

If you are under Obstetric Team Care (also known as Consultant-led Care) during your pregnancy, labour or after the baby is born, the lead professional is a Consultant Obstetrician. 

You will usually be under Obstetric Team Care if you have additional factors to consider during your pregnancy or delivery. The team also work closely with the Midwifery Teams.  

During labour, if things are progressing normally, you may be looked after by midwives with minimal involvement from the Obstetric Team. 

 

Ultrasound and screening tests

* Please do not bring children to your appointments as we are unable to accommodate them due to the continuing Covid-19 situation, thank you *

During your pregnancy, you will be offered tests to find out your blood group, and to see if you have any antibodies to red blood cells. These tests are normally carried out at the beginning of your pregnancy and again in the last three months. This leaflet, Blood Groups and Red Cell Antibodies in Pregnancy , explains why blood groups and antibodies are important in pregnancy.

What are Screening Tests?

Screening tests are used to find out if you have a higher chance of a health problem.  They are used to make sure you get earlier, potentially more effective, treatment or to help you make informed decisions about your health and your pregnancy.

The screening tests offered during pregnancy in England are either ultrasound scans or blood tests, or a combination of both.

Ultrasound scans may detect conditions such as spina bifida.

Blood tests can show whether you have a higher chance of inherited conditions such as sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia, and whether you have infections like HIV, hepatitis B or syphilis.

Blood tests combined with scans can help find out how likely it is that the baby has Down's syndrome, Edwards' syndrome or Patau's syndrome.

What are the risks of screening tests?

Screening tests cannot harm you or the baby but it is important for you to consider carefully whether or not to have these tests.  Remember, it is up to you whether or not you choose to have screening tests in pregnancy. It is a personal choice that only you can make.

You can discuss each of the screening tests you're offered with your midwife or doctor and decide whether or not it's right for you.

For more detailed information on screening and ultrasound tests, including a video (with subtitles) covering the tests you will be offered throughout your pregnancy, please visit the NHS screening page here.

Information and advice on the individual health conditions screening is available for, can be found on the Government's page - Screening tests for you and your baby (STFYAYB)