Stroke survivor’s advice to people ignoring symptoms or worried about coming into hospital in an emergency during COVID-19 | Latest news

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Stroke survivor’s advice to people ignoring symptoms or worried about coming into hospital in an emergency during COVID-19

“Don’t hesitate – acting fast saved my life”

Stroke survivor’s advice to people ignoring symptoms or worried about coming into hospital in an emergency during COVID-19

A Nottinghamshire lady recovering from a stroke is encouraging people not to hesitate to come into hospital in an emergency.

Carol Wright, who is 64 and from Carlton, was at home with her husband during lock-down when she suddenly began to feel unwell, she says:

“I knew instantly that something wasn’t right, I was trembling, the room was spinning and my speech was deteriorating”.

She managed to ask her husband to call 999, and the next thing she remembers was being carried down the stairs by the paramedics as she was unable to walk or move properly.

When she arrived in hospital, it was discovered that she had a clot on her brain, so she was then given a clot busting injection followed by having a clot extraction.

Praising the staff at Nottingham University Hospitals, from the doctors and nurses, to the porters and the paramedic team, Carol says: “I have no complaints, the care was second to none - I was incredibly well looked after and they saved my life”.

Returning home to her husband four days later, Carol’s successful outcome has left her thankful to the NHS and more aware than ever of the importance to go to hospital when something doesn’t feel right. She mentions that even now, she is still receiving regular calls from Nottingham University Hospitals to check on her recovery.

 

Carol’s story comes as the NHS is urging people who may be having a stroke to come forward for care, as the latest statistics show that visits to A&E in April dropped by almost 60 percent in the Midlands.

The NHS act FAST – (Face, Arms, Speech, Time) acronym is a simple test to help people identify the most common signs of a stroke, and emphasises the importance of acting quickly by calling 999:

Face – has their face fallen on one side? Can they smile?

Arms – can they raise both arms and keep them there?

Speech – is their speech slurred?

Time to call 999 

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