Nottingham Respiratory Consultant awarded national Research Professorship | Latest news

Nottingham Respiratory Consultant awarded national Research Professorship

Gisli Jenkins, Consultant in Respiratory Medicine at Nottingham University Hospitals (NUH) and Professor of Experimental Medicine at the University of Nottingham has been awarded a prestigious National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Professorship.

NIHR Research Professors are some of the country’s most outstanding research leaders.

The five-year, £1.7m award recognises Professor Jenkins’ pioneering work in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), a progressive lung disease with a worse outcome than most cancers. Professor Jenkins is leading Pulminorary Fibrosius research as part of the NHIR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, which is hosted by NUH.

The NIHR award will allow him to extend his research by analysing genetic, biological and phenotypic data to identify biomarkers of pulmonary fibrosis. He said: “I am so excited about receiving this award because it will enable a step change in translating my group’s understanding of disease biology into better therapeutic strategies for patients with pulmonary fibrosis.”

Pulmonary fibrosis is a process that leads to progressive scarring in the lungs and ultimately death. Pulmonary fibrosis affects over 50,000 people in the UK but early, subclinical disease is likely to affect many, many more.

Professor Jenkins added: “This award will allow time and resource for my group to develop our understanding of molecular and cell-specific pathways to identify markers of disease activity. These can be used to personalise therapy for patients who are likely to benefit from treatment regardless of why or when they get fibrosis. In short, it will enable us to treat the right patient, with the right drug at the right time.”

NIHR Research Professorships aim to promote effective translation of research and strengthen research leadership at the highest academic levels. They enable outstanding academics to spend five years dedicated to translational research, and to develop capacity in areas critical to accelerating the transfer of research ideas into improved health.

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